The Best Kind of Distraction

The Best Kind of Distraction

As a recovering task-oriented person, I struggle. Sometimes my motivation to get things done is so laser-focused that I am abrupt with people if they interrupt me. Distraction is the enemy, isn’t it? When I get in “the zone”, get out of my way.

Surely, it’s not my best quirk.

The Best Kind of Distraction

Some time ago, a friend of mine posted a picture she took from inside her house out into her driveway. It was a picture of her husband and their three boys shooting hoops.

She humorously captioned it with the explanation that her husband originally headed outside to mow the lawn, but spontaneous hoop-shooting had distracted him from his task. The lawn never got done that day. However, the boys had fun with their dad.

I commented on her photo that this was the best kind of distraction.

For a long time, I failed to take time to allow good distractions from whatever my task was. I shooed my kids away. I asked them to wait to tell me something if I was busy. I rushed past my husband without giving him a kiss hello. I hustled off the phone if someone called me.

Unfortunately, I was chronically on a mission, usually one that could have waited a moment.

We all missed out when I didn’t allow them to distract me. Over the past couple of years, God has been showing me how to pause and learn to embrace these distractions.

Even if all my kids want is to tell me a convoluted story or show me a Lego creation, they are worth it. Sadly, I didn’t always view it this way. I was caught up in my own busyness.

My humanness and connectedness to others must take precedence over my to-do list.

My husband, a man of infinite patience and wisdom, is gifted at grounding me when I get on my frenetic Gotta Get Stuff Done Crazy Train. He will stop me, gently hold my upper arms and tell me to look at him. In those moments, he reminds me that I can take a moment to give him a kiss or listen to the kids.

He understands the importance and beauty of the best kind of distraction. I’m grateful for a partner who balances me in this way. He’s a blessing.

I urge you to embrace these sweet distractions when they come.

A phone call from a friend I don’t often talk to is the best kind of distraction.

A quick game of Uno before the dishes get done is one also.

A creative, hopeful little boy who wants to ask scientific, philosophical, and unanswerable questions at exactly the busiest moment deserves to be heard.

A spontaneous chat in the driveway with a seldom-seen neighbor is worth the time.

If I am to learn to be still at the feet of God, I have to extend the practice into my daily life also. I must allow time to be distracted by good things.

If I’m ever so busy that I can’t kiss my husband, listen to my children, or chat with a neighbor, then I need to rethink my priorities.

My humanness and connectedness to others must take precedence over my to-do list.

Learning to be a listener, taking a pause, and being a human (not a machine) are all part of a discipline I’ve not mastered yet.

I still fail at times, but at least it’s less often than I used to.

If I’m ever so busy that I can’t kiss my husband, listen to my children, or chat with a neighbor, then I need to rethink my priorities.

The more I learn to quiet my heart and mind before Jesus, the better I will be at pausing when the best kind of distraction pops up.

In thinking about Jesus and the issue of distraction, I’m reminded of his rebuke to his disciples in Matthew 19. Jesus was engaged in teaching and healing, as well as answering questions from the Pharisees. It had been a busy day and Jesus was on the move.

As people started to bring children to Jesus to be blessed, the disciples attempted to shoo the children away, claiming that He didn’t have time for such things. He answered for Himself and made His opinion clear.

Jesus said, “Let the little children come to me, and do not hinder them, for the kingdom of heaven belongs to such as these.” -Matthew 19:14

Jesus, the Son of God, who fully understood that His time of ministry on earth was limited, took time for people. He often stopped to give personal attention to individuals.

He viewed people as important and made time for them. After all, His mission in the first place was to give Himself as a sacrifice for all people.

What good is a Savior of mankind who doesn’t take time to pay attention to people?

That said, I am learning to follow His lead. If I am to truly love people, I must make time for them, even if I am busy. By acknowledging them, I build relationships. I make memories. I become blissfully distracted. Hopefully, you’ll enjoy some distractions this week too.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE: Choosing Abundance: 3 Steps to an Abundant Life and The Quiet Season

 

 

 

 

Hi! I’m Tracy…Christ-follower, wife, mama, writer, blogger, speaker, teacher, dreamer. I love Earl Grey Tea and quiet mornings. Here at Earl Grey and Yellow, the focus is striving to be faithful and appreciate the small things. So glad you stopped by. Please have a look around and subscribe to our newsletter and social media to stay connected.

6 thoughts on “The Best Kind of Distraction

  1. I loved this Tracy, “If I am to learn to be still at the feet of God, I have to extend the practice
    into my daily life also. I must allow time to be distracted by good things.” So absolutely true! I
    can’t tell you how many times I’ve been irritated by good distractions—like little boys trying
    to show me lego creations—that I’ve ignored. This was a timely, wonderful reminder. Thank
    you!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *